Airplane Thoughts

When I flew back to the U.S. last week (a casual 26-hour trip) I watched two films that were drastically different and yet exactly the same in their messages. One film was called Human Flow by Ai Weiwei and the other was Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, directed by Martin McDonagh. After I watched the first one, I cried a lot. And then I watched the second one and cried a lot too. And after I finished crying a lot, I thought a lot. 

What if we were raised in a culture of acceptance instead of in a world where “good” and “bad” and “right” and “wrong” are defined differently among people to the point where disagreement becomes disrespectful? 

I asked myself what it means to me to feel home in a place that was not always my home. I came to the U.S. seventeen years ago with my family, as an immigrant, and when I think about what that was like, and then I think about refugee families today and what it must be like for them, I feel so much pain. 

My wish would be for everyone who arrives in this country to find safety and feel home, but I know that not all do. I know that fear drives people to choose actions that are easily mistaken for reactions based on hate or judgement. But I also know that we, as humans, are inherently good, and that we are so capable of loving each other no matter where we come from. I know the latter is a stronger and better know, because that is the know that I lived. 

I arrived here at ten years old, and I felt accepted. I went to school and was approached politely by children wanting to be friends, despite the fact that my skin was darker and my eyes smaller. My teachers saw potential in me and guided and supported me genuinely. Strangers smiled at me and showed me kindness. Neighbors treated me as an equal neighbor. And it didn’t take long to feel home.

In Weiwei’s film I didn’t see much of my own story. I saw the version of mine that is a nightmare for me but a reality for others today. And no one deserves a reality like that. I don’t know the solution to the refugee crisis around the world, but I know what I can do and what I am willing to do. And it matters; small actions matter because in the end it is not about the action, but about the exchange between people.

After watching Three Billboards, I realized something that allowed for a new level of awareness in me: We need to get a head start in understanding and internalizing the idea that we are supposed to be in this together. That really is how simple it is. 

Both Three Billboards and Human Flow are talking about the same issue but framing it in different stories. In Three Billboards, the fighting parties come from the same place and are separated only by how they were raised and the roads between them. In Human Flow, they are separated by oceans and wars and cultures. Both are trying to tell us that we are separating ourselves from each other and it’s killing us. We’re nourishing hatred and bigotry and racism and ignorance and differences and we are choosing enemies in the people we share this Earth with. That’s not fair, and we have to fix it.

There is a quote in Human Flow that is important for the world to hear: “It’s going to be a big challenge to recognize that the world is shrinking, and people from different religions, different cultures, are going to have to learn to live with each other.” It shouldn’t be a challenge to meet our neighbors in the middle. It should be natural to our humanity.

In Three Billboards, Woody Harrelson says,Through love comes calm and through calm comes thought.” Love should be our first language as people. Love should be at the center of our existence, as individuals and as a species.

We are better than what we are doing to each other right now. We have to put it together, and we have to take it seriously. We need to choose love, and we need to choose it more often. 

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Day 10: Germany / Norway / Beer

I remember waking up at the crack of dawn in Rome, and taking a cab to the airport to catch my flight to Germany, where I would meet my friend Ninna so we could fly to Oslo together.  The difference between my arrival and departure in Berlin was not very long–I literally walked off one plane and walked onto the other.

It was a quick flight and just enough for us to catch up on the last two weeks that we were apart.  Girl stuff, boy talk, all that drama, etc.

When we landed in Oslo, we went straight to her house and spent the next few hours on her back porch, sunbathing, drinking beers, relaxing.  Just looking at this picture makes me want to go back!

A couple beers later, we went to Aker Brygge, which is a bay area in Oslo with buildings, boardwalks, restaurants, and a great view of the water.  We had shrimp and wine–very Norwegian–and I have to say, it was a real treat.  I didn’t even realize how expensive EVERYTHING is in Norway.  I didn’t believe Ninna when she warned me…but take my word for it: you do not want to be a student tourist in Norway.  More like No-way!

At this time of year in Oslo, the sky doesn’t get completely dark.  And if that’s not weird enough for you, check out this photo I took at 11 pm:

It is so bizarre, but so cool.  I’m not gonna complain about having more sunshine in my life!  I will gladly take as much Vitamin D as I possibly can.  Tis a beautiful, natural wonder.